I’m Refi The Cash Out Man

Sing to the tune of Popeye the Sailor Man:

I’m Refi the Cash Out Man.  You’re lookin’ for cash in hand.

Your house is worth plenty, you can access them pennies,

So cash out?  Indeed you can.

We’re in a pandemic, you hear jumbo lenders

won’t refi your equity spare.

But that ain’t the truth and I’ll show you the proof

if you’ve managed your money affairs.

I’m Refi the Cash Out Man.  You’re lookin’ for cash in hand.

If you still got a job and your credit’s the bomb,

If the mortgage makes sense then get off of the fence,

Call Refi the Cash Out Man!

Shiver me timbers,

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

Your Credit May Be Good, But Is It Jumbo Good?

“I have an 800 FICO so I know I’ll qualify…”

We, here at Guaranteed Rate, pride ourselves on being a great jumbo mortgage lender. And because of my geography and clientele in the San Francisco Bay Area, we encounter a lot of higher loan amounts. Our rates are very competitive and we have many investors who can cover the needs of just about every jumbo loan scenario that can realistically be done these days. Moreover, we retain control of the underwriting, so we can exercise “makes sense” judgment and get files approved where many other banks and brokers cannot.

Yet, we are not immune to the quirks of the current state of jumbo mortgage lending and credit tradeline requirements definitely fall into the “quirk” category. A theme that will emerge here, and true to our opening statement, is that FICO score alone does not a jumbo approval make. As we’ll see, the credit requirements for jumbo loans reach beyond a borrower’s score and delve deeper into the components that comprise those very numbers, namely:

  1. Credit history — depth and age of tradelines.
  2. Blend of credit — distribution of open credit between mortgage, installment and revolving debt.
  3. Use of credit itself — how recently have accounts been used?

If you are in the market for a jumbo mortgage, it’s important to work with a mortgage professional early, as some of these requirements simply cannot be met in the time period it would take to close a traditional escrow. Let’s look at one jumbo investor’s credit profile requirements:

  • Minimum of 3 open tradelines with minimum of 12 month history for EACH borrower.
  • Authorized user accounts cannot be used to meet minimum tradeline requirement.
  • Credit depth must be a minimum of 2 years.
  • All 3 tradelines must have had current activity.

Or another’s:

  • Minimum 3 tradelines open and active for at least 24 months.
  • At least one of the three tradelines must be a mortgage or installment loan.
  • Remaining tradelines must be rated for 12 months.

So, a moral of this story might be that you may indeed have a very good FICO score. But if you do not demonstrate to a jumbo mortgage investor that you can produce a high score by way of the behavior that they believe will most likely lead to repayment of their loan, you may find yourself on the outside looking in. Remember, if you don’t like to use credit — if you pay cash for that auto, if you eschew credit cards — this can be highly effective financial behavior from a personal standpoint, but it can leave the mortgage lender in the dark about whether you’ve got the right credit curriculum vitae.

 

If you have questions about a jumbo home loan and/or about how your credit report and profile will be viewed by a jumbo lender, get in touch today. I can help you make sense of what it takes to qualify for a jumbo mortgage, and in many cases, we can find just the right investor to work with your existing credit profile. Your credit may already be excellent but we’ll make sure it’s jumbo good.

 

Rob Spinosa
Senior Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960
Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood ChicagoIL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

Howdy, Partner!  How’s the Income Look on Your Mortgage Application?

I don’t care how successful your S-Corporation or partnership may be.  When you go to get a home loan, there will be a new sheriff in town — your mortgage lender.  So before your loan process gets hung up at high noon, I thought I’d let you in on a secret about how most lenders will qualify your income.  Let’s go, amigo.  We’re burnin’ daylight.

Check Yourself

Most of what we focus on below will pertain to the self-employed partner or owner in an S-corp.  The widely-accepted definition of ‘self-employed’ is greater than a 25% ownership interest in any business entity.  So, look at your K-1 form if you don’t already know.  If your ownership interest exceeds 25%, you can expect that your mortgage lender will ask you for not only your personal income documentation (as applicable); paystubs, W-2 forms, K-1 forms and personal tax returns (1040 Federal Tax Return), but also the Federal tax returns of the business entity itself.  In the case of a partnership or LLC, this will be a Form 1065 and in the case of an S-Corporation, this will be an 1120S.  “But wait!” you say, “They can claw the business returns out of my cold, dead hands!”  OK, that’s why we’re having this conversation, partner.  Get this straight with your tax professional and the other owners before finding yourself in this one-horse town.  If you’re greater than a 25% owner, we need your business documents too.

Saloon Math

Assuming you’re greater than a 25% owner and we now have the ability to review your documents, we’re going to start analyzing your income by reviewing your K-1 forms.  A very key piece of your qualification, and one that most do not know about, is that we are primarily looking for distributed income.  Owners who receive ordinary income (Box 1) but do not have distributed income will often have difficulty qualifying with K-1 income.  Yes, they could still qualify with so long as the business itself is not showing a loss in that year(s), but frequently a business owner will have both compensation to officers (W-2) and K-1 income.  When income is not distributed, we will next turn to the balance sheet on the business tax return and seek to prove business liquidity.  We will almost always require additional support from the tax preparer to state that distribution of previously undistributed income would not cause financial harm to the business.  These kinds of requirements often rankle not only the tax preparer but the business owner himself/herself.  So again, before galloping into this town, guns a-blazin’, have your posse ready to save your hide.

The OK Corral

Here’s what I find most often.  If a business (partnership, LLC or S-corp) is doing well and paying both wages and distributed earnings to its owners, it’s a fairly straightforward qualification.  Yes, there is more documentation required but if the business keeps good books, none of this is tragically problematic for the borrower.  Where a business is not distributing earnings, things can get a little trickier, but certainly not impossible.  Lastly, and thankfully more rarely, are businesses where they are paying out wages (W-2 earnings) but posting a loss on the K-1 and/or business returns.  These borrowers should expect for that cover to be blown shortly after getting out of the saddle.

If you are a self-employed business owner, especially a partner, LLC member or S-Corp owner and you are having difficulty getting a great loan, don’t assume that your loan officer understands how to qualify your income.  Sadly, many in our profession lack the knowledge, expertise and experience and there is no education or licensing requirement that could assure you they know what they’re doing.  Ultimately you would find out once your loan goes through underwriting, though you may not have the luxury of waiting.  If you need clear, expedient answers on these scenarios, whether you are a borrower yourself or a tax professional assisting a borrower with a mortgage application, get in touch any time and I’ll be happy to help.

Giddy up, 

 

Rob Spinosa
Senior Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960
Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood ChicagoIL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

What Kind of Insurance Do You Need When You Buy a House?

Let me start by saying that I’m not in the insurance business, but that the insurance business is in mine.  And my business is helping home buyers and homeowners get a great mortgage.  So just what are the insurance requirements when you buy a home or go to refinance a mortgage on residential real estate you own in California?  Why does your lender care about the insurance coverage you keep?

Homeowner’s Insurance

Also known as “hazard insurance,” or “fire insurance,” this is the key policy you will be required to carry if you have a mortgage.  While the actual coverage may seem to be a clear benefit to you, there’s a mutual benefit for the lender.  After all, the home is both where you live and the collateral for the lender’s loan.  Without the home itself, it’s unlikely the lender would/could ever be paid back in the event of a loss.  By this logic, some homeowners who are “free and clear,” meaning they have no mortgage, will opt not to carry a homeowner’s policy.  In the event of a total loss from a fire, for example, they would be completely out of a place to live with no reimbursement for loss of its use.  Ouch.

Flood Insurance

If your lender determines that your property is in a FEMA special flood hazard area, you’ll be required to carry flood insurance.  Regulation requires that mortgage servicers impound your flood insurance premium even if your homeowner’s insurance and property taxes are not impounded (aka “escrowed”).

Earthquake Insurance

Earthquake insurance is not required by lenders in California, even though the risk of earthquake damage is real in many areas.  You can, at your discretion, purchase earthquake insurance but only about 10% of CA owners will choose to do so.

Title Insurance

When you buy a home and use financing, you’ll be required to get a “lender’s” title insurance policy.  This protects the lender from title defects and future claims against the title (which, like with homeowner’s insurance, could jeopardize their rights to the collateral).  You’ll notice that you’re also being quoted an “owner’s” policy, which is technically optional.  The vast majority will purchase this coverage too, and with good reason.  Should anyone claim an interest in your property down the road, the owner’s policy would provide you cover and the title insurer would step in to deal with the claim.  Worth noting is that the owner’s title insurance policy is in effect for the time you own the home.  The lender’s policy is in place for the time you hold the specific loan involved in the transaction.  If you refinance, you would purchase only a new lender’s policy.

Life Insurance

Like earthquake insurance, life insurance is not required when you take on a mortgage.  Also like earthquake, it may not be a bad idea.  Life insurance can help a surviving spouse pay off or better manage the payments on a loan in the event of the death of the other spouse, and you can make a very good argument that life insurance is an incredibly responsible financial purchase to consider at the time of home ownership.  We work with some great life insurance agents on a regular basis, so ask if you need a recommendation.

Private Mortgage Insurance

I am including private mortgage insurance or “PMI” in the insurance category because it makes sense that when borrower looks at the voluminous paperwork involved in buying a home, all of the insurance terminology starts to look the same.  But PMI is exclusively related to your mortgage and if you’re putting at least 20% down and/or not using an FHA loan, you may not have PMI at all.  So the best way to look at PMI is not as an insurance coverage required by the property, but one sometimes required by the loan.  You also do not need to “shop” for PMI like you would any of the other insurance types listed above, like homeowner’s.  Your lender should always attempt to find the least expensive private mortgage insurance available among the eligible providers.

So, to recap.  If you have a mortgage on a home, you will always need homeowner’s insurance and a lender’s title insurance policy.  You may be required to carry flood insurance.  Depending on your loan’s characteristics, you may also be required to have private mortgage insurance.  Owner’s title insurance, earthquake insurance and life insurance are up to you.  If you need help or perspective on these decisions and choices, I am always available to share my experience and insight.  We routinely work with many great insurance professionals because our industries are inevitably intertwined with the financing of real estate.  If you would benefit from a referral, please don’t hesitate to ask.

You’re in good hands, 

Rob Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960
Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

The Yin and Yang of Mortgages for Business Owners

It is no secret that the self-employed have their share of challenges when it comes to getting a home loan. And why wouldn’t they? On one hand, their tax professionals spend hours maximizing their deductions and helping them “write off” every allowable expense and on the other hand, their mortgage loan advisor tells them they have to show more income in order to qualify.

But can these seemingly opposite or contrary objectives actually be complementary, interconnected and interdependent and come together to allow a business owner to get a great mortgage?  Is there a yin and yang relationship somewhere in this puzzle?

Indeed, there may be a solution for some of these borrowers. On both the purchase and refinance side, we have a jumbo mortgage program that allows the self-employed to qualify with bank statements instead of tax return income. We’ll look at 12 months of business and personal bank statements but we won’t request pay stubs, W-2 forms or personal or business tax returns. Here are the key points:

Who is Eligible for a Bank Statement Mortgage?

This program is a match for the self-employed business owner with two-year history of operating the sole proprietorship, LLC, S-Corp or C-Corp. We prefer to see 100% ownership of the business but we can make some exceptions to this guideline. We do not allow any major derogatory events (bankruptcy, foreclosure, short sale, etc.) within the last five years. Realtors, independent contractors and other professionals who receive a 1099 are also ideal candidates for this bank statement loan.

How Does a Bank Statement Mortgage Work?

We’re next going to look at 12 months’ worth of business bank statements and we’re going to get a sense of the business deposits over that period of time. We’ll apply a 50% expense ratio to derive our qualifying income. So, for example, if the business shows $40K of monthly deposits on average, our business owner and borrower now has $20K per month of qualifying income. Simple as that, except we exclude any windfall deposits, transfers to and from accounts or anything other than legitimate business deposits.

What Else Do I Need to Know?

We will permit all occupancy types (primary, vacation and rentals) and we’ll allow loan-to-values (LTV) up to 75%. Interest-only payment options exist and our maximum debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is 47%, because this is a non-QM program. Simply, you have more flexibility under these guidelines than under the stricter qualifying parameters of a qualified mortgage (QM). Best of all, and worth repeating, we will not request your tax returns and we don’t need to see a profit and loss (P&L) statement for the business — the bank statements are our path to inner peace and harmony.

Bank statement qualification mortgages can open the door for the hard working business owner who has heretofore had little luck getting a hefty mortgage payment to fit into his skinny tax returns. If you’d like to know more about this program today, get your ticket at the station, get in touch and I’ll be happy to help.

Confucius say, 

 

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office: 324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA 94960
Berkeley Office: 1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA 94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate. In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

Can You Add Remodel Costs to Your Mortgage?

One homebuyer niche I know extremely well is 10% down payment jumbo mortgage financing.  We have a good number of prospective homeowners in California, especially here in the San Francisco Bay Area, who earn strong income, who have an excellent credit profile but who just do not yet have the full 20% down payment saved for home prices that are, compared to the rest of the country, very high.  These buyers have certainly not failed and they are not out of luck either.  Once they understand just how competitive an 80/10/10 or other 10% down solution can be, they are often back out on the market in no time, and with renewed optimism.

It is here that they will sometimes find their next challenge, though it is not one that is limited to just a 10% down payment structure.  Several of these buyers will come across a property that will need immediate renovation, remodeling or repair — assuming they are able to have their offer accepted.  Their next question to me will be “Can you add the cost of remodeling or renovation into the mortgage?”  The answer involves several concepts so let’s address them one by one.

Lenders use the lesser of the appraised value or the purchase price to determine loan-to-value (LTV).

If we take our “cosmetic fixer” and have an appraiser give it the ol’ once over, will the appraised value match or exceed the price the buyer is paying for the home?  If the answer is “yes,” we don’t have any issue, but if the answer is “no,” we, as the lender, are going to use the smaller number to determine the loan-to-value (LTV).  Let’s say the buyer is in contract to buy the home for $1MM.  The buyer is financing 90% of that price, or $900,000. Now let’s say the property appraises for $950K.  Again, we can finance 90% of the lesser amount so in this case that’s $855,000.  Remember that if the buyer was planning to “put down” $100K in the original example, and if the contract price does not change, the buyer can ONLY finance $855K but is still buying at $1MM.  This now implies a down payment of $145K. More on this next…

You cannot finance more than your loan program’s LTV threshold.

In our example just above, we are forced to increase the down payment because we would otherwise have an LTV (or “combined loan-to-value”) of more than 90% and our program guidelines may not allow for that.  I’m not saying that no loan program can exceed that threshold, just that our buyers were presuming their financing would meet a 90% limit.  When the appraised value comes in lower than the purchase price AND an LTV threshold is crossed, like at 20% down or 10% down, the buyer’s financing will need to be adjusted.  Sellers often recognize this and may be concerned about accepting an offer if they feel a low appraisal would tank the buyer’s loan approval.  This is the logic behind a 30% down payment appearing more attractive than a 20% down payment, for example.  If a buyer puts down 30% and the appraisal comes in low, chances are that buyer can still keep the existing terms of his/her loan (maybe the LTV goes to 72% or 73% — but that doesn’t blow anything up).  On the other hand, if a buyer is getting a loan with 20% down and the property doesn’t appraise, now that buyer either needs to bridge the difference in cash, get a small second mortgage (if permissible by the first mortgage guidelines) or take PMI (if available).  You can see why this might tip the seller’s scales in favor of larger down payment offers.

The property must appraise “as is.”

Both of our examples above assume that the property is in sufficient condition to appraise “as is” and not subject to repairs and completion.  The status of the report is indicated via checkbox.  If the property’s condition requires extensive rehabilitation or has obvious health and safety deficiencies, a conventional loan may not be an option at this time.  That brings us to our next point…

 

There are programs that may specifically address remodel and/or construction.

This is the province of the construction loan, the rehab loan, the FHA 203K, etc.  We’re not going to cover those here but know that when you’re dealing with a construction loan, the approach to financing is fundamentally different.  Whereas an “end loan” or a “conventional” loan will work off of the appraised value, a construction-type loan will look to completed, repaired or rebuilt value to set LTV.  But here, understand that you’re not just getting a larger loan and a “get out of jail” card.  The lender needs to know the plans, the scope of work, the schedule of completion, etc.  In other words, you’ve got not only a loan on your hands, but a project too.  For the average buyer just looking to purchase a home, a construction loan comes with an additional, and serious, set of considerations.

So getting back to our original question, “Can you finance the cost of renovation or remodeling into your purchase money mortgage?”, the short answer is “No.”  The better answer is that “it depends,” but we must recognize that what we’re really doing in most cases is preserving the buyer’s cash.  Where a construction loan program is not being used, this is often the best outcome to which we can aspire.  But remember, for any home loan program you select, you cannot finance more than your maximum loan-to-value or combined loan-to-value (LTV or CLTV) and your loan officer can guide you on these.

This is a simple concept that is often confusing and difficult to grasp in the real world, so don’t be embarrassed to ask questions and drill down (no pun intended) on the math.  Just because you may not be able to finance future improvements now does not mean that the home is not a great fit for your family, your future needs and your budget.  And like always, a sound understanding of concepts will go a long way towards helping you make the best decision.

Sleeves rolled up, 

 

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office: 324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA 94960
Berkeley Office: 1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA 94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate. In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

#OKBoomer, You Don’t Need 20% Down

Bound to happen from time to time in the digital age, a saying goes viral — in this case, “OK, boomer,” — which is meant to expose a close-minded or out-of-touch opinion, thought or mindset of one generation by another (I’ll let you figure out the age demographics here). Hopefully, the topic of this blog will transcend generational differences and address the assumptions about the down payment one needs to make when purchasing a home, versus the reality of what we see every day with those who are actually buying homes. I think you’ll be surprised at the expanse between fact and fiction.

Let’s start by saying that in the US, it’s been widely assumed that a homebuyer must make a 20% down payment of the purchase price. This concept has been propagated from one generation to the next and since Americans have been buying homes instead of carving them out of frontier land. In fact, not a week goes by where we don’t get a call from a prospective buyer that starts with an iteration of, “We’d like to buy our first home but we haven’t saved 20% yet…” Yet, over at least the last 20 years, the average down payment across the US has hovered closer to 6 or 7% of the purchase price. A far cry from the gold-standard 20% many buyers struggle to save. Let’s look at the number of ways that contribute to a buyer’s access to lower down payments:

0% Down Payment

Veterans and those in rural areas may have access to 100% financing. The VA loan program is a huge benefit and great way for our industry to show appreciation for those who have served our nation. The USDA loan program has geographic restrictions, but for some may also allow access to the financing without a down payment.  VA loans also have access to 0% or reduced down payments at loan levels that exceed the nationwide, $484,350 1-unit max.

3% Down Payment

Conforming loans still permit a 3% down payment up to a loan amount of $484,350 (thus permitting a purchase price of approximately $510K at max leverage). Yes, these loans have PMI, but they can be a great entry program for the first-time buyer, and they are not restricted to veterans, rural areas, income limitations or property types. Conforming loans are accessible by all who qualify and programs like the Home Ready mortgage have PMI that is less expensive as well.

3.5% Down Payment

FHA loans come in at 3.5% down, and in many areas, FHA loans are the bread and butter of the market. Borrowers with lower FICO scores, higher debt-to-income ratios and other challenges that could trip up a conforming loan, may find the FHA program to be the best fit. And, FHA will permit 3.5% down even in high-cost areas where the conforming loan limit exceeds $484,350. Remember that on conforming loans, even in high cost areas, once above a loan amount of $484,350, the down payment requirement steps up to 5%.

5% Down Payment

Conventional, high-balance (or super-conforming) and even jumbo will come into play with a 5% down payment. Again, the higher loan amounts and purchase prices may not touch every state, but across the country stats have proven that this level of initial investment is closer to the norm when it comes to buying into the real estate market.

10% Down Payment

Even in super jumbo land (loan amounts that exceed the high-balance conforming limits) and up to price points that much of the country would consider absurd ($3MM+), believe it or not, a 10% down payment mortgage is an option. And we do them with frequency here in CA. For a while, the toughest aspect of getting a 10% down loan had nothing to do with the borrower, but instead we observed that sellers in competitive markets overlooked these offers in favor of buyers who structured their financing with a larger down payment. Now that we’ve seen some softening in the higher price points, motivated sellers are again considering qualified buyers with 10% down payments.

If you examine the statistics for down payment patterns, you’ll see that some states, like California, tend to trend toward the higher end of percentage down payments (approaching 20%). This is due to higher purchase prices in many cases and the fact that those prices push out some of the programs that permit lower down payments. But in other states (GA, for example), home prices in concert with percentage of veterans, rural areas, and so on, can push the down payment average percent below 3%. As always, all real estate is local and you should consult with local professionals on your options. But make no mistake, boomer or otherwise, you don’t need 20% to get into most markets. And if you have questions, send me a letter or give me a call or page me or e-mail or text or Skype or message me when you’re ready to set aside your preconceived ideas and focus on the way it really is today.

Stop, hey, what’s that sound? 

 

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office: 324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA 94960
Berkeley Office: 1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA 94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate. In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

I’m SUArta Back! The FHA Spot Condo Approval

Mortgage lenders that see a fair amount of FHA loans have, for the last few years, lamented the loss of the condominium “spot” approval. This erstwhile shortcut would allow a single unit of a condo project to be eligible for an FHA loan even where the entire project might otherwise not pass muster. And for FHA, it’s been widely recognized since the sunsetting of the spot approval that buyers whose search requires an FHA loan and a price range that might only include condos, had real challenges ahead. Specifically, their target inventory would need to be confined only to existing FHA-approved projects, which can be found on the FHA approved condo list.

However, as of 10/15/2019, the Federal Housing Administration has reinstated a version of the spot approval. As one would expect with such news, there are misconceptions about how it will be implemented. The main ones stem from announcements suggesting a tremendous anticipated increase in FHA condo approvals as a result of the new FHA spot approval process.  While there will undoubtedly be an increase in FHA condo lending, it will mainly be because the new process allows lenders that were not previously authorized or willing to assume the risk of full project approvals to do SINGLE UNIT APPROVALS (SUA) in projects that are not currently FHA approved.

However, this new SUA/SPOT program is not a streamlined review process and it is not similar to Fannie Mae’s “Limited Review” or Freddie Mac’s “Streamlined Review” on the conventional side. SUA documentation requirements are similar to FHA full project approval criteria, and obtaining documentation for full FHA project approval can take anywhere from 30 to 90 days. Guaranteed Rate will be providing SUA (Spot) Approval within 24 HOURS from receipt of ALL of the required documents, but the time and effort needed to collect the required documentation remains the same. Another misconception is that it will somehow be easier for projects to qualify for SUA (SPOT). In actuality, it is the opposite, as there are items that are more stringent for SUA/SPOT approval than full project approval.

That said, we here at Guaranteed Rate still see this as a great thing for our buyers and our industry. For instance, there will undoubtedly be condo loans originated on projects that do NOT qualify for SUA (examples: FHA concentration within the project or single entity ownership exceeds SUA thresholds). In these cases, we’re capable and staffed to handle full FHA (HRAP or DELRAP) approvals, adding additional value to condo agents, buyers, owners, and sellers. Get in touch any time if you feel these are services that can help you today.

I’ll be back, 

 

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office: 324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA 94960
Berkeley Office: 1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA 94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate. In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

How Can I Make My Home Appraise Higher?

Whether buying or refinancing a home, when obtaining a mortgage it can be expected that an appraisal will be required. I talked in a previous post about how we are able to use appraisal waivers in certain instances, but still, most residential real estate transactions that involve a mortgage also involve an appraisal. An appraisal is a professional opinion of value, completed on a standardized report by a licensed appraiser. Are there steps the buyer or homeowner can take to assure that this value comes in as favorable as possible? Here are a few tips from the experts:

  • Choose a lender that uses an appraisal management company (AMC) with access to local appraisers. At Guaranteed Rate we place a high degree of importance on contracting with appraisers that know any area first-hand. This has the obvious advantage of bringing “boots on the ground” perspective to the property being appraised. But let’s not forget too that local appraisers are also often well-known appraisers to local real estate agents and these relationships are valuable.
  • Clean the house and yard. The cleaner the home the better it shows, and the higher value you will get.
  • Prepare a list, including cost estimates, of improvements completed to the property in the last year. If any updates have been done to the kitchen and/or bath within the past 15 years, include them on this list as well.
  • If you, or your Realtor, know of a good sale (or two) in the area within the last six months, you can give the address and sales price to the appraiser.
  • If refinancing, tell the appraiser the predominant feature of your home — the reason you bought it and the characteristic a future buyer may find most important and desirable. This may seem everyday obvious to you, but could easily be lost on even the best appraiser — who doesn’t live in the home each day.
  • Be mindful of “health and safety” issues, regardless of how minor. An opening in a wall, water stains on the ceiling, a disconnected faucet, peeling paint or a missing handrail on a staircase may all seem trivial, but they could require further notation in the report, potentially stalling your transaction. Make the small repairs in advance (or have the seller do so), even if it means hiring a handyman.
  • Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors because in many areas (if not all!) it’s the law. Also, here in California, if you have a water heater, it must be double-strapped for earthquake safety.

Stacking the deck in your favor using the tips above, and working together with us before and after the appraisal is complete, you can maximize your potential to attain the highest value. This can then open up financing options and opportunities, and even factor into the interest rate you’re able to obtain. When you are refinancing a home, the home’s value relative to your existing loan balance determines your eligibility. When you are buying a home, you and your Realtor will want to know the appraised value supports the contract price. In both instances, if you have questions about the appraisal process, and especially if you have concerns about the subject property’s value, we are here to help.

I spy, 

 

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office: 324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA 94960
Berkeley Office: 1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA 94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate. In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

The Haunted Loan Process

As we wind our way closer to Halloween, I wanted to cover a few of the graveyard variety hobgoblins of the mortgage process.  You know, the things our clients don’t tell us at the start and that later come back to haunt their home loan transaction like so many nightmares on Friday the 13th.  The goal here is not to scare the prospective borrower, but instead to provide fair warning about the actions you can take or avoid at the start of your application that will help you close your loan on time and without undue stress.  Let’s peek-a-boo at some of the most common loan zombies that come out when the moon is full:

  1. Amending a tax return.  It can be such an innocent mistake.  You file a tax return and later amend it for some reason.  When we ask you for your tax records, you provide us with your Forms 1040, but forget there is a 1040X out there as well.  We order an IRS transcript (Form 4506T) and our numbers on the tax return don’t match the numbers on the 4506T.  Now, you’re not in trouble with us or the IRS, but we do have to underwrite to the amended return.
  2. Beginning or not disclosing ongoing work on the property.  Open walls, torn up flooring, room additions underway, no fixtures in a bathroom, an empty swimming pool, etc.  This is not a complete list, of course, but always tell your lender if your home is in any way undergoing work (or will be) when an appraiser comes out.  In general, you will not be able to fund your loan until all work is complete and a reinspection by the appraiser confirms such.
  3. Changing or leaving jobs, or giving notice.  Expect that every lender will complete a prior-to-funding (PTF) verification of employment.  If you are no longer on the job just before close, or if you’ve signaled your intent to leave the job, we may have a major issue.  In short, the employment by which you qualify for the loan is the one that needs to be in place when you close.
  4. Co-signing on a debt for someone else.  Most often, co-signed debts will show up on the credit report, but if they are new or unreported to the credit repositories, we often have to factor them into the debt ratio (DTI) at that time.  The conventional wisdom is to never co-sign for anything.  In reality, life is more complicated than that and it happens.  Where it does, tell us up front.
  5. Disputing a credit item.  It may seem like the right thing to do and it may make you feel better about sticking it to a creditor who’s done you wrong, but disputing a credit item while in the loan process can take on a ghoulish character.  The advice here is don’t do it until we’re funded, but at the bare minimum, let us know when you’re thinking about it.
  6. Failing to disclose a property you own.  Our borrowers often believe that if they own a property free and clear, there’s no way we’d know about it (and more importantly, why would it matter?).  But remember that real property ownership means there’s county records and we can find those.  And about the fact that it’s free and clear?  Good for you but it still doesn’t address property taxes and insurance?  Those go in your DTI too.
  7. Moving unsourced money into your bank accounts.  This one has stopped more purchases of brick and mortar than Amazon.  When you go to buy a home, know that we will look back at least two months (via bank statements) to confirm that all of the money for your down payment, closing costs and reserves is accounted for and meets guidelines.  If you try to move money into your account, we will often question the deposit.  So it’s essential we identify, reveal and document how you plan to close the transaction when it comes to your money.
  8. Not making a mortgage payment when refinancing.  “But I thought we would close by then…”  Famous last words.  Remember, when you are in the loan process, you are not done until you have keys in your hand or, in the case of a refinance, your new loan is funded and recorded and the old loan has been officially released.  During that time, it’s imperative you continue to make your regular mortgage payments.  “If there is any doubt, there is no doubt,” goes the old mountaineer’s saying.  Keep your existing mortgage current at all times.
  9. Recurring payments for a loan or other obligation.  If you have undisclosed debts or payments and we see a recurring withdrawal from your bank accounts, expect that we will ask.  If the item is discretionary, it’s likely no issue, but if it is an obligation we will want to consider it in your debt ratio.  The sooner we find out about it, the better.  So let us know at the outset.
  10. Taking on new debt before closing escrow on your purchase.  Early in my career I had a young, homebuying couple sign their loan documents on a Friday afternoon.  Jubilant with their new purchase, they spent the weekend shopping for furniture and outfitting their new home, including opening a store credit card where they proceeded to take advantage of the new customer discount on their large purchases.  On Monday, when confronted with the question of whether they took on any new obligations over the weekend, they said yes.  Their rationale?  “Oh, we closed when we signed on Friday.”  The lesson here is that it’s not entirely their fault.  Our industry can do a better job of explaining the closing process and when borrowers are “all clear.”  I learned a lot from that experience and have used the lessons ever since.  On a purchase transaction, you are not closed until you are signed, funded and the deed is recorded with the county.

Look, some of the above may seem funny or obvious.  But the reason I’ve listed them is because they happen.  Over and over and over.  We’ve dealt with each and if you find yourself in a bind as a result of any of them, don’t hesitate to get in touch.  We don’t stand in judgment of how things happened and instead we focus on solutions.  Let me know if I can be of service today.

Trick or treat, 

Robert J. Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending
Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960
Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283