Marin County Vote by Mail Ballot Drop-Off Locations

This election cycle, there has been much disinformation propagated about voting by mail, and in an effort to help fellow community members arrive at the truth, I am providing below the drop-off locations as an additional way to submit your ballot prior to November 3. To receive an absentee ballot, you must have first registered online. Once you’ve received and completed your ballot you can mail it back or drop it off. At any time, if you need help or additional information, you can access it at www.marinvotes.org.

San Rafael

  • Albert J. Boro Community Center, 50 Canal Street, San Rafael, 94901 
  • Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, 94903
  • Marin Health and Wellness Campus, 3240 Kerner Blvd., San Rafael, 94901
  • Whistlestop, 930 Tamalpais Ave., San Rafael, 94901

Corte Madera

  • Corte Madera Recreation Center, 498 Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera, 94925

Fairfax

  • Fairfax Town Hall, 142 Bolinas Road, Fairfax, 94930

Novato

  • Novato Library, 1720 Novato Blvd., Novato, 94947

San Anselmo

  • San Anselmo Town Hall, 525 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo, 94960

Sausalito/Marin City

  • Marin City Library, 146 Donahue St., Sausalito, 94965

Bolinas

  • Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Road, Bolinas, 94924

Point Reyes

  • West Marin Health and Human Services Center, 1 Sixth St., Point Reyes, 94956

About Fraud

The nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice conducted a meticulous review of elections that had been investigated for voter fraud and found “miniscule incident rates of ineligible individuals fraudulently casting ballots” — no more than 0.0025 percent.

Up until this point, I never thought a service I might provide to our clients moving into the county might be providing information about how to cast a ballot. But with all that’s at stake this time — and every time really — I’m leaving nothing to chance.  Whether by mail, by drop-off at the locations above, or in person, make sure your voice is heard and your vote is counted.  

Get out the vote,

Rob Spinosa

Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate

NMLS: 22343 

Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 

rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office: 324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA 94960

Berkeley Office: 1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA 94709

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate. In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

1984

Look, I realize I should be so lucky to think that someone from the Van Halen camp is going to bust me on a copyright infringement for using the image above.  So if they come a calling, this is what I would tell them:

I originally wrote this blog post on the 34th anniversary of the release of Van Halen’s 1984 “album.”  I was a dark-skinned, plenty-awkward eighth-grader settling in for a long Illinois winter.  With no discernible basketball talent, no academic prowess and eliciting zero interest from the cute, middle-America girls who hailed from the Arrowhead subdivision and peopled the halls of our junior high, the basement my Dad built out for us threatened to be a pain cave of epic boredom proportions for at least the foreseeable future.  That is, were it not for the crackle of the phonograph needle that succumbed to the majestic OBX polyphonic synthesizer swells of “1984.”  Like watching sunrise over the Earth from outer space, that short, haunting prelude to the massive hit “Jump,” would give way to the dawn of a different day for me.  

Most of us have a favorite “album,” and again I use this word in quotes because the format for delivering music has evolved so drastically over the years.  We can likely all name at least one collection of tunes that formed the audio backdrop for a trajectory change in our lives.  Even hearing just a snippet can hearken back to a summer on the beach, an old flame, or the very essence of our youth.

Coming of age for most of us is a painful metamorphosis cocooned somewhere in the silk of our teenage years.  But for me, the strains of 1984 literally reached out of my boombox and put an electric guitar in my hands.  Then, having summarily equipped me for my calling, those nine songs transformed me, for the very first time, into an autodidact and demonstrated that a dream is meant to be pursued with innocent, if infinitely energized, abandon.  No matter how crazy and audacious the goal, when you smell like teen spirit and have little to lose, it’s your once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to give it all you’ve got.  You may not end up emulating your hero note for note, but that matters a lot less than the amount of growth you’ll experience for strumming along — with enthusiasm, with passion and with purpose. 

Thanks to a career I now love in the mortgage business, I meet a lot of people.  As introductions go, I’ll get an occasional, “Are you from California?”  “Why no…,” I will answer, and often they’ll next ask how I found myself in beautiful Marin County, just north of San Francisco.  “Well, in the late ’80’s, I moved to L.A. to pursue a career as a rock guitar player, like Eddie Van Halen….”  Pause…..  “What???”

Since the album came out, I listen to the 1984 intro every year on my birthday.  First it was on vinyl, then cassette, then CD, then my shuffle and now just my phone.  Regardless, it re-centers me with a time and place that are gone, but with an optimism that will never die.  I would be willing to bet that most of us have a musical bond to that very pivotal moment in our lives when we became much of who we would be for the rest of our lives.  What’s yours?

Might as well jump!

Rob Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343 
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
 

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

What Are Credit Tradelines?

I think I’ve made it clear before that I find no shame in talking about how hard we work for our clients. My assistant, Jamie, and I see a good number of mortgage applications come across our desks every week and in 2019 and 2020, a high percentage of them have been for jumbo home loans, which means that our borrowers must demonstrate strong credit depth by way of an adequate number of tradelines on their credit report. Gone are the days when one could just have a decent FICO score in order to cross credit concerns off of the loan approval list.

When we talk about credit tradelines and credit depth, most of the prominent jumbo mortgage banks like to see recent credit activity (that is, use of credit and timely payment) to consider any account active. And that’s really what a “tradeline” is — an account. An individual tradeline might be a mortgage, an auto or student loan or a credit card. All are different types of “trades” but in the case of revolving debts like credit cards, use of those cards in the last year or two is what really brings the tradelines into active status and works to meet the jumbo lender’s requirements.  By far, the gold standard for jumbo credit is three active tradelines with activity in the last twelve months, per borrower.

So in that spirit, I’m going to let you all in on a secret for getting a great jumbo loan if you are thinking that a mortgage application may be in your future in the coming months. Here are three GREAT ideas for taking that seldom-used credit card lurking in the back of your wallet or purse, or that forlorn department store card that you forget you had, and turning it into a bona fide active tradeline which, in turn, makes you eligible for the widest selection of jumbo loan programs.

1) The Starbucks Triple Mocha Frappuccino (Venti): $4.95

This frosty beverage will set you back both 500 calories and 500 centavos — but don’t you dare pinch pennies to pay this time. Instead I want you to reach for the least-used credit card in your quiver and rack this hefty charge on that piece of plastic. By doing so, you’ll bring this credit card to “active status” within the last 12 months and you’ll be on your way to both cardiac arrest and credit qualification.

2) Nashua Tape 1.89 in. x 120 yd. 300 Heavy-Duty Duct Tape (2-Pack): $10.88

Race fans! Hot rodders! Weekend warriors! Remember when you bought your house and your mother-in-law gave you a $100 gift card to Home Depot? Remember when you used it all plus another $400 on that initial visit and they convinced you to open a store card, take advantage of the discount and then pay the rest off later? Remember too that you haven’t used the card since that day twelve years ago? Well, now’s the time to repair everything in the house with duct tape. We already knew of its all-purpose abilities, so you’re burnin’ daylight, pardner. Get crackin’ on those DIY projects and the ‘honey do’ list and pick up a two-pack just in case.

3) The Warren Plaid Boxer: Now $15.00

One other thing that we know is that if someone is going to have a collection account on his credit report, and it’s going to be of the variety of which he’s unaware, it’s either going to be a medical bill or a Banana Republic store card (close third to a cell phone bill never received). I’m not sure why this is, but people go bananas over Banana’s billing. So let me help you save your credit shorts and get into a clean, fresh pair of undies while at the same time giving you an excuse to A) actually locate your Banana Republic card, B) place an order on it before they call you to tell you it’s been inactive since Marky Mark made skivvies the shizzle and, C) bring your store card to active status in the eyes of Equifax, Experian and Transunion.

My point(s) above are simple.  Active credit tradelines are a critical component to getting a great jumbo loan, but you can’t create them after you’ve applied for a mortgage. When we pull your credit report as part of the pre-approval process we’re looking at both credit history and recent activity but the time to address both is BEFORE you’re in the mortgage process. Or while you’re saving for your down payment. Or while you’re waiting for more inventory to hit the market, etc. Bringing your unused tradelines to active status is a little step you can take that will pay a big dividend later — opening up the widest array of jumbo options and, as a result, giving you access to the most competitive rates.  Let me know if you have questions about this aspect of getting a jumbo loan and I’ll be happy to help you craft a road map to success and hey, I might even let you in on a few more bargains as well…

Venti triple mocha frap for Ron,

Rob Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343 
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
 

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

Can I Refinance a Mortgage on a COVID Forbearance Plan?

Back at the end of the first quarter of 2020, the president might still have wanted to downplay COVID, but many real American homeowners suddenly found themselves in dire financial straits and quickly took advantage of the forbearance plans offered by the servicers of their mortgages.  This payment relief allowed them to navigate the most uncertain and immediate impacts of the pandemic and for some, provided a bridge to re-employment and/or firmer financial footing.  Now that some of these borrowers have made readjustments to the new normal, they may wish to take advantage of the historic low interest rates that have stemmed largely from the Federal Reserve’s response to this same pandemic.  So can a borrower refinance if there has been a forbearance or deferral on the current loan?  Let’s examine the options available today if the borrower has a conforming/conventional loan.  Jumbo loans and government loans (FHA and VA) behave differently and I’ll cover those in a separate post.  But here’s what we need to know today:

  • If you are or were in forbearance with no missed payments, then we must verify that all payments were made to terms of the agreement AND the payoff of the existing loan cannot include any funds due. 
  • If you were in forbearance, had missed payment but brought them current prior to making your refinance application, then we just need verification that your mortgage is current and no funds due to complete any reinstatement are included in the loan’s payoff.
  • If you were in forbearance, had missed payments and brought them current after making your refinance application, then we need verification that your mortgage is now current and we need to source the funds used to bring the loan to that status.
  • If you have a plan for payment deferral then you must provide a copy of the agreement issued by your servicer and you must have made at least 3 consecutive payments following the effective date of the deferral agreement.  The payoff of the loan can, in this case, be used to satisfy the full amount of the mortgage, including the payments deferred.

The low rate environment that exists today is unprecedented, a lot like the adjustments we’re all being required to make as we confront our new reality.  If you’ve taken advantage of the forbearance or deferral agreements available to you, and have adhered to the terms, there’s a good chance you can refinance your conforming or high-balance conforming mortgage today at historic low rates.  You’d be incorrect to assume otherwise.  Get in touch if you think we can help. 

Mask it or casket,

Rob Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343 
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
 

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

Should I Keep Making My Mortgage Payment?

With so many people refinancing these days, and with the loan process sometimes crossing one or two months’ time, a question we frequently get from those in process is, “Should I keep making my mortgage payment?”  The answer is a simple and clear, “Yes!”  

But let’s talk about why, because the concept is as simple as it is often misunderstood.  In our formative financial years, many of us rented a home or apartment before we made the leap into home ownership.  And I’d be willing to be bet that more than a few of us got chased by a landlord about the rent being a few too many days late past first of the month.  Herein lies the mortgage payment dilemma when it comes to refinancing.  Unlike rent payments, which are due on the first of the month and cover the month ahead, mortgage payments are applied in arrears.  This means that you live in the house in August, for example, and you pay for that time (in interest and principal) on September 1.

Now let’s assume you’re refinancing a home and your expected close of escrow is the 10th of August.  Let’s also assume that you have not made the mortgage payment on the first of August.  Your mortgage has a grace period until the 15th of the month, after which you are assessed a 5% penalty.  But back to our closing scenario — the payoff demand on your existing loan, once received by escrow, will include all of the days of interest for July, plus the expected days of interest in August until the close date of the transaction.  Your new lender will collect prepaid interest from August 10 through August 31.  You will “skip” a September 1 payment altogether (no regular payment with either old or new servicer) and your first payment with the new loan will be due on October 1.  Got it?  OK, great.  But remember, on August 1 and into August AND until escrow closes, you are still responsible for your August payment!  If for some reason you don’t close on the 10th and there are delays past the 15th (where you’d incur a penalty) and, heaven forbid, delays past the end of the month where you’d report late to the credit bureaus, the responsibility to have made the August payment falls squarely on you.  

The best advice any of us can give on any mortgage transaction is to ALWAYS make your payment if you are unsure of how things will work out or if your lender or closing agent is not responsive or clear on the matter.  Until your new loan is funded and closed, you are ALWAYS responsible for making your mortgage payment and the risk of going 30 days late on your home loan is a risk too great to run.  Any overpayment, as painful as it might be, is far less damaging than the credit blemish of a missed payment.  If you have questions on any scenario, get in touch and we’ll be happy to explain further. 

The check is in the mail,

Rob Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343 
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
 

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

How To Win a Real Estate Bidding War

What’s the one thing you can do to make your offer to buy a home stand out?  What’s the secret sauce, the magic bullet, the key to success?  

If you answered, “There isn’t one,” you’re pretty close.  Truth is, I haven’t found any singular aspect of any offer that assures success.  All-cash offers, zero-contingency offers, overbid offers, offers with colorful “love letters,” etc., none of them provide any guarantees to the hopeful buyer.  But there is one thing I’ve noticed that does increase the odds dramatically — stacking advantages.  

More often than not, we observe that the winning bid is a combination of the right price, the right terms and the right people.  The weight given to each will vary, but these three elements seem to be common ingredients in the proverbial taking of the cake.  Ideally, you can exert a great degree of control over these aspects:  You can offer the price you want.  You can set the terms as they fit your situation and you can choose your Realtor and lender.  You have every reason to be optimistic.

The Price Is Right

I once had a seasoned Realtor tell me, “it’s often about price, but rarely exclusively about price.”  This is good advice and it’s also why financed buyers are sometimes surprised to learn they beat a competing cash offer.  Perhaps the “sure thing” its assurances of a fast close were not compelling enough to entice to the seller to forego the higher price you may have offered, sometimes because you were using financing.  So determining when to bid under, over or right at list price matters and it’s a foundation for the rest of the offer you’ll build.

The Terms-inator

Having the right terms on your offer helps appeal to the seller’s confidence level (or lack of it) in you, the buyer.  Your terms also speak to the seller’s preferred timing and need to control a sequence of events.  One might assume that a fast close is always the ticket here, but…not so fast.  Some sellers actually need more time to close and recognizing their key thresholds will help you craft the terms you’ll state for releasing your inspection, appraisal and financing contingencies, as well as the timing of the close.

Not Everyday People

If you’re ever so bored that you need to kill an afternoon, look up how many real estate licenses have been issued in your area.  Next, look up how many of those active licensees transact one or less purchase or sale per year.  My point here is that you have a choice of your real estate representation and choosing wisely makes a big difference in your success ratio, even before you set foot in an agent’s car.  Locating a Realtor who knows the market intimately, has current negotiation experience and who garners respect in the community provides an edge perhaps greater than all the others.  Of course, choosing your lender wisely matters too, and in many areas where competition is fierce, we have learned firsthand that the listing agent will accept or not accept a buyer’s offer based on who is providing the financing.  If the listing agent knows a lender can be reached as needed and has been accountable to them and their colleagues in the past, your offer takes on new meaning.

Hundreds and hundreds of transactions have given me a window into what it takes for buyers to succeed when they place an offer on a home they wish to buy.  The results of that perspective confirm that it’s rarely any single aspect of their offer that has the ability to seal a deal, but instead the right combination of factors.  By “stacking advantages,” including offering a compelling price, setting the most appealing terms and using strong professionals on their team, a buyer’s odds increase exponentially.  And the best part about all of this?  Buyers control each block in that stack — so use great care!

Timber!

Rob Spinosa
Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343 
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
 

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

Some Days You’re the Statue

Is that you, gallantly astride a horse in battle?  Or do you stand resolutely for your cause, eyes affixed on the distant future?  Are you seated, confined in thought, or are your arms outstretched above the world below?

As a nation devoid of unifying leadership observes the desecration of some of its most cherished and ignored monuments, it struck me that beneath the patina of opportunistic vandalism — which I would rather not condone (the toppling of Saddam Hussein’s monument gets a carve out) — it’s become increasingly difficult for some to stride past the manmade features of our landscape without peering into the soul of the soulless and saying, “Is this who we really are?”  With these existential questions exposed to the elements of recent events, imposing figures that had survived undisturbed for decades outside are, all of a sudden, stirring passions inside.  The core of our constitutions, personal and national, is being worked out in full view.  Side-taking in our warming climate has been an inevitable side-effect.  Some of us have heatedly jumped into the fray, others have coldly unmasked opinions from their phones.

But here’s the thing about statues.  They are created to stop time.  People, on the other hand, are not.  And times change.   Presumptuous as the notion might be, what might my own statue look like?  If time stood still and I was cast in bronze, what would the future say about me and my life’s work?  Think I’m just some high-minded jerk?  OK, what would the future say about you?  I’ll admit, I didn’t draft the Declaration of Independence while also holding slaves, yet I still know that if I am to remain affixed to, or be forcibly removed from, any pedestal a century down the mirage of my road, it will say as much about me as it says about those who render that verdict.  In 2020, do any of us have the capacity to reconcile any level of contradiction and moral inconsistency in the ghosts among us or are we headed for absolute purity tests that leave only rubble in their wake?  

I believe America can survive the death of some of its dead, but as I observe what’s happening, I am rethinking how the future might weigh in on those living today.  I’ll go first.  What values do I hold that are simply not gonna stand the test of time?  Have I been an agent of greater good or lesser evil?  What visions occupy my creativity and intellect, and do I dedicate the necessary energy on imagining a better future for our heirs?  What will it take to set those ideas in motion now and to quit waiting for the cavalry to come? 

Speaking of horses, there was a time when the might of any army could be measured by them. Times change.

And some days you’re the pigeon,

Rob Spinosa
Senior Vice President of Mortgage Lending

Guaranteed Rate
NMLS: 22343 
Cell/Text: 415-367-5959 
rob.spinosa@rate.com

Marin Office:  324 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo, CA  94960

Berkeley Office:  1400 Shattuck Ave., Suite 1, Berkeley, CA  94709
 

*The views and opinions expressed on this site about work-related matters are my own, have not been reviewed or approved by Guaranteed Rate and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Guaranteed Rate.  In no way do I commit Guaranteed Rate to any position on any matter or issue without the express prior written consent of Guaranteed Rate’s Human Resources Department.

Guaranteed Rate. Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee NMLS License #2611 3940 N. Ravenswood Chicago, IL 60613 – (866) 934-7283

What the NRA Can Learn from the Mortgage Business

Show of hands.  How many of you identify the mortgage business, or better still, the subprime mortgage business, as the face of the last economic downturn?

Right or wrong, our industry served as the convenient scapegoat for what was, in reality, a much larger issue.  As a result, we were specifically rewarded with a tectonic shift in regulation and oversight in the years that followed.  The wrath of the pendulum swing exceeded even our wildest expectations.  The legislative edicts ushered in by the Dodd-Frank Wall St. Financial Reform Act, and its appointing of a top cop in Richard Cordray of the CFPB, dawned a Dark Ages of credit availability.  And though we’ve since become quite adept in making more with less, our industry will never be the same as a result.  Some would say we had it coming.

Though the record will reflect that I was never a purveyor of subprime or stated income loans myself, I thought I would share my enlightened experience with the NRA.  It seems to me they are finding themselves on the business end of a growing chorus of Americans who sense that a change is in the air and that the National Rifle Association is, this time around, the industry with the target on its back.  That when innocent people are being gunned down in schools, at a concert or nightclub or, Lord have mercy, at church, something ain’t right.  And I believe that one of these mass tragedies or another, or another, or another is going to be a last straw, a final stick in the spokes that sends the NRA’s whole Second Amendment joyride to a caterwauling, head-over-the-bars crash of spectacular proportions.  But it doesn’t have to be this way.  No, this relative calm before the storm is the NRA’s opportunity to carefully concede, on some of their own terms, to ideas whose times have clearly come.  This is their last chance to marshal the last chance their brakes might arrest the careening descent of their overburdened, dilapidated old truck of ideas about gun ownership and gun rights.  Before the wheels come off, they can either figure out what’s most important to their constituents, carve it out and keep it, or they can keep on barreling down their path to oblivion.

The mortgage business never sobered up.  We couldn’t police our own punch bowl and leave the party in time so it ultimately took a Big Bang before it all went bust.  After the smoke cleared, many walked away with tail between legs and without shirt on back.  In retrospect, seems like cutting a bargain or two to avoid a complete meltdown, followed by a complete lockdown, would have been a sweet deal.  But no, not us.  We, too, were once invincible.  We goaded them to come pry the NINJA loan out of our cold, dead hands.  Then eventually, inevitably, they did.

Now it’s the NRA’s turn to get on the right side of history, embrace sensible change and help move America forward on this very complex and important debate.  Or, they can continue to party like it’s 1899.  If they do, they gotta know the cops are on their way.

Knock, knock, knockin’ on heaven’s door, 

Robert J. Spinosa